Category Archives: women’s studies

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March for Life Photo Essay

I didn’t know what to expect at my first March for Life last week. How would I fit in? Everyone knows pro-lifers are patriarchal, angry, white men.

African American women pro-lifers March for Life

This family marches together annually.

Rebecca Kiessling March for Life

The courageous Rebecca Kiessling*.

March for Life

Don’t you love their yellow hats?

Asian American woman pro-lifer March for Life

Chose life for her daughter 24 years ago.

Radical, right-wing extremists.

adopted from Korea March for Life

International adoptee.

March for Life sign to President

Um, Mr. President…

conceived from rape March for Life

Bold and beautiful.

Religious fundamentalists.

secular pro-lifers March for Life

Self-proclaimed secular pro-lifers.

Uneducated.

pro-life generation LSU March for Life

Here comes LSU…

Sienna College pro-life generation March for Life

and Sienna College…

Carnegie Mellon pro-life generation March for Life

and Carnegie Mellon…

Hateful.

pro-life couple  March for Life

Married, marching since 1974.

adopted not aborted father and son March for Life

Thanks, Mom and Grandma.

adoptive mother March for Life

Their Mom and Grandma with her sign.

thou shalt not kill March for Life

Love says.

Ugly.

I'm worth waiting for March for Life

“I’m worth waiting for.”

Really, really old.

birthday pro-lifer March for Life

You say it’s your birthday?

face it March for Life

Face it.

young pro-life women March for Life

Defend life.

Curmudgeons who don’t have any fun.

pro-life drummers March for Life

Boy band.

Definitely not cool.

pro-life jeans sign March for Life

He got a little “change” in his pocket.

nose ring pro-life March for Life

Pro-life generation, nose rings and all.

Illiterate.

a person is a person March for Life

The wisdom of Seuss.

Insensitive.

pro-abortive couple March for Life

Brave couple.

They don’t care about women and children.

mom with stroller baby March for Life

Marching mom.

mother with baby March for Life

Mother and child.

mother with babies March for Life

Stroller brigade.

life counts child on shoulders March for Life

Watching from Daddy’s shoulders.

In fact, they don’t care about women’s rights at all.

new wave feminists March for Life

New wave feminists are pro-life.

me and Jewels Green of Feminists for Life

Me and Jewels Green of Feminists for Life.

personhood for all March for Life

Personhood for all.

Totally irrelevant.

Capitol Hill March for Life

On Capitol Hill.

Not enough of them to cover in the news anyway.

March for Life 2013

Is this enough?

March for Life 2013

How about this?

March for Life 2013

Or this?

Just a handful of loonies.

Constitution Avenue view March for Life

View from Constitution Avenue.

Who aren’t going away anytime soon.

Old Glory March for Life

Old Glory in the March for Life.

40 years too many March for Life

40 years too many.

God’s plan looked foolish to men, but it is wiser than the best plans of men. God’s plan which may look weak is stronger than the strongest plans of men. 1 Corinthians 1:25 NLV

Let Mercy Lead by the timeless Rich Mullins.

pro life chick

pro-life chick

“Various media outlets put the estimate for this year’s March for Life crowd at between 500,000 and 650,000.” Catholic News Service

The March for Life is scheduled for January 22nd of both 2014 and 2015, marking the 41st and 42nd anniversaries of Roe v. Wade.

Every picture tells a story. What’s your favorite?

*I was surprised and delighted to run into Rebecca Kiessling in the crowds at the March for Life. To hear her story, please watch Reclaiming the Human Center of the Abortion Debate or see Rebecca’s website.

Also, if you haven’t already, please see my written report on BlogHer Walking the March for Life for the First Time.

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Filed under America, life, women's studies

March for Life Story on BlogHer

March for Life mom

pro-life mom I met at March for Life

I’m home safe and sound after an exciting trip to Washington, D.C., and I’m thrilled BlogHer News has published my story Walking the March for Life for the First Time.

BlogHer, thank you for showing a diversity of women’s perspectives.

Everyone, I would be so grateful if you would please click over to BlogHer to read and share the story. Here’s the link:

Walking the March for Life for the First Time

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A Time to Speak

In a small town in another state, a 19-year-old woman finds out she’s pregnant. She lives with her widowed mother and has little money. Her baby’s father has abandoned her. The shame of her community presses down on her.

The year is 1970. Unwed motherhood isn’t worn as a status symbol by celebrities. Single parenting isn’t the norm. There are no support groups or pregnancy centers. No 3-D ultrasounds. Abortion is illegal.

If her pregnancy had happened three years later in 1973 when Roe v. Wade legalized abortion in the United States, I wonder if that young woman would have chosen to abort her baby. If so, you wouldn’t be reading this.

That woman was my mother and I was the baby she carried.

Had abortion been legal in 1970, my mother would have been a prime candidate. Poor, unmarried, young, alone, afraid. Strong voices might have coached her choice. She wasn’t ready to parent. She couldn’t support a child. Why not just take care of this matter now?

Fast forward 25 years. My mother was in the fight of her life against cancer. Had euthanasia been legal in America, she would have been a prime candidate for physician-assisted suicide. There was no treatment for her disease. Strong voices might have coached her choice. Why burden her family and the system? Why prolong the inevitable?

My mother was my best friend, compassionate and kind. She died before I, as an adult, could ask her what it was like for her when I was born or what it was like for her to knowingly approach death at age 45.

She died before she could tell her story. I don’t want to do the same.

If Guttmacher’s statistics are anywhere near accurate, someone reading this is a mother or father whose child was aborted. I have no interest in condemning you. You made a legal choice in a heartbreaking, maybe even desperate situation. You may have felt coerced or kept in the dark about what was truly happening. You may harbor regret, sadness, anger, grief, or you may be numb to the experience. There is healing and forgiveness in Christ for you just as there is for me.

Look around. A lot of people are missing who are supposed to be here. It’s estimated more than 54,000,000 Americans have been legally killed by abortion since Roe v. Wade. We cannot comprehend all that was lost with those lives.

My heart aches for what my mother went through and what others face. But killing people is not a life-affirming answer. Not for the child, the parents, the disabled, the elderly, the terminal patient, our families, or our society.

What if we as a nation find ways to care for parents in crisis pregnancies and protect their babies’ lives? Can we resist the deception that euthanasia and abortion give us control without consequences? Will we hold fast to God’s timing in life and death? What does it say about the value of our own lives if we don’t?

I never asked my mother if she was glad she had me; I didn’t have to. Her love, courage, and sacrifices for me told me she was. My husband and son are also glad, and if my dog could speak, she’d tell you the same. And me? Am I glad abortion was illegal when my mother was pregnant with me?

Yes. Unapologetically, yes. I am thankful for life. Are you?

Speak up for those who cannot speak for themselves;
ensure justice for those being crushed.
Yes, speak up for the poor and helpless,
and see that they get justice. Proverbs 31:8-9 NLT

This is Your Life by Switchfoot.

Who are you missing? What’s your story?
Who will you tell?

Today is the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court case that legalized abortion in the United States. Later this week, I’ll participate for the first time in the March for Life in Washington, D.C. I’d appreciate your prayers.

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Filed under America, family & friends, life, women's studies

Shampoo

In a few short years, I’ve gone from washing my hair every single day to betting how many days I can go without washing my hair.

bloggess wannabee back

who’s that girl?

I suppose I could call it a matter of health. Most hair stylists agree. It’s not healthy to wash your hair every day. (I’m speaking of women here. Men, wash at will.) Over washing can mean over drying, especially as we get older and our hair loses its natural moisture and shine.

Good grief. That sounds like a shampoo commercial.

What was once a luxurious cleansing ritual now results in tresses crisp as sun-dried straw. Not pretty. Plus it takes so long to blow dry. Once upon a time, I thought nothing of spending hours on hair and makeup. Today it’s different. Pardon me, but I need to wash and go.

You know, I think it all started with that child I have. My hair was voluminous and glowing when I was pregnant with him. A few sleep-deprived months after giving birth, my hair (and the rest of me) looked tired. I barely had a moment to shower, much less dry and style. Besides, who has time for hair when there’s a boy’s childhood to be lived? There are Legos to assemble, imaginary wars to fight, books to read. Alas, I succumbed to the inevitable. I got mommy hair.

I cut it short. Then shorter. Then shorter. Then I saw myself in a photo. Shocked back to my senses, the race was on. A race more grueling than any marathon. Many of you recognize this perilous trek. Cursed is the day you agreed to layers and bangs. Your psyche bears the scars of the race to grow out your hair.

Since crossing the finish line about four years ago, I’ve kept my hair long. Pinterest helps me cope with impulses. When I see a photo that inspires me to cut my hair like hers, I pin it instead. Then I can think about it before I act on it. Maybe I’ll cut my hair short again some day. For now, I’ve relinquished my daily shampoo in order to preserve some semblance of health on my head.

I have to wonder if all this dryness has to do with our environment. No, not global warming. I’m talking about humidity. My hair was raised in Southern humidity. Most of my time in the Midwest has been spent in the drenching, river town seasons of St. Louis. It’s only recently we moved to the arid prairie-land of Kansas. Even the snow is dry here. Surely that must take a toll on my hair.

bloggess wannabee

I am not the bloggess (as if there was any confusion about that)

One of my friends has her hair done at the salon each week. She swears by the blow out. Says she doesn’t have to do a thing between visits. My stylist suggested pricey keratin treatments to make my hair like silk. Moisturized, manageable, lustrous silk.

But I know stress shows up in my skin. Makes sense it would show up in my hair. Forget the humidity, the expensive treatments, the weekly blow outs.

What I need is a vacation.

And even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. Matthew 10:30 NIV

Props to the 90s and Swedish bands. Beautiful Life by Ace of Base.

What do you and your hair need?

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Filed under humor, women's studies

Reader’s Choice ’12: Bellies on Vacation

Amy Heinz

Amy Heinz

Amy Heinz is the girl next door… and then some.

Besides having a very cool first name, Amy is a mommy blogger extraordinaire. Her blog Using Our Words was named Best NorCal Mom Blog by Circle of Moms this year and was a finalist in the Red Tricycle Totally Awesome Awards. You can catch Amy’s parenting posts on Disney Baby, too.

I got to know Amy online through a mutual friend, and this year I had the privilege of meeting her in person at the BlogHer Conference in New York. When she saw me sitting in front of her in a session, she texted me. Repeatedly. Only she was texting the wrong number.

Chalk up accidental cyber stalker to her list of accomplishments. Amy and her winning sense of humor have had a big year.

Amy’s Reader’s Choice is:

Bellies on Vacation

bikini belly

click to read Bellies on Vacation

readers choice

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Reader’s Choice ’12: Whisper

Darin Grimm picked a story I was afraid to publish.

Darin Grimm

Darin Grimm

The subject has torn our country apart. We cannot seem to settle it. The night before this story ran, I recited Psalm 56:3 to myself so I could sleep.

Who would have dreamed Darin, a farmer and president of AgChat Foundation, would be a fan of this post?

“It takes a VERY devisive topic, and presents it in a compassionate way,” he said. “A way that I saw shared by a couple of people that I’m pretty certain see this issue differently than you do.”

There are more stories brewing that scare me. But this one was first.

Darin’s Reader’s Choice is:

Whisper

matchlight

click to read Whisper

readers choice

One month from now, January 22, 2013, will mark 40 years since Roe v. Wade legalized abortion in the United States.

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Reader’s Choice ’12: The MOB Confronts Cattiness Against Boys

Call Ariel K. Price a bookworm, and she’ll consider it a compliment.

Ariel K. Price

Ariel K. Price

Ariel is an editor, writer, and reader. Her passion for words is her life’s work.

She’s also a feminist. Here’s an excerpt from her comment when she first read the post she selected for Reader’s Choice:

“This is why so many men don’t take feminism seriously: they just see a bunch of angry women who want to hurt them. As a feminist, I know it is in my best interests to show love and graciousness to men, while also fighting for my equal treatment and respect.”

Exactly. Ariel’s Reader’s Choice is:

The MOB Confronts Cattiness Against Boys 

my skills make boys run

click to read The MOB Confronts Cattiness Against Boys

readers choice

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Filed under America, family & friends, women's studies